Wikipedia

I did some research on 12 Step Programs and topics related to Sexual addiction, also known as sex addiction, is a conceptual model that describes compulsive participation or engagement in sexual activity, despite negative consequences. It is considered by its proponents to be the same thing as hypersexual disorder. In clinical diagnostics, the term sexual dependence may also refer to a conceptual model that is used to assess people who report being unable to control their sexual urges, behaviors, or thoughts. Related models of pathological sexual behavior include hypersexuality, erotomania, nymphomania, satyriasis, Don Juanism (or Don Juanitaism), and paraphilia-related disorders.

Clinicians, such as psychiatrists, sociologists, sexologists, and other specialists, have differing opinions on the classification and clinical diagnosis of sexual addiction. As a result, “sexual addiction” does not exist as a clinical entity in either the DSM or ICD medical classifications of diseases and medical disorders.  Read more


Sexaholics Anonymous (SA) is one of several twelve-step programs for compulsive sexual acting-out based on the original Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. SA takes its place among various 12-step groups that seek recovery from sexual addiction: Sex Addicts Anonymous, Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous, Sexual Compulsives Anonymous and Sexual Recovery Anonymous. Collectively these groups are referred to as “S” groups since all their acronyms begin with that letter: SA, SAA, SLAA, SCA, SRA.

SA helps recovering “sexaholics.” According to the group, a sexaholic is someone for whom “lust has become an addiction.” SA distinguishes itself from other S groups by defining sexual sobriety as no sex with self or with partners other than with one’s spouse “in the marriage between a man and a woman”, and progressive victory over lust.

“In defining sobriety, we do not speak for those outside Sexaholics Anonymous. We can only speak for ourselves. Thus, for the married sexaholic, sexual sobriety means having no form of sex with self or with persons other than the spouse. For the unmarried sexaholic, sexual sobriety means freedom from sex of any kind. And for all of us, single and married alike, sexual sobriety also includes progressive victory over lust”. Read more


 

A twelve-step program is a set of guiding principles outlining a course of action for tackling problems including alcoholism, drug addiction and compulsion. Originally proposed by Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) as a method of recovery from alcoholism,[1] the original Twelve Steps were first published in the 1939 book Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How More Than One Hundred Men Have Recovered from Alcoholism.[2] The method was adapted and became the foundation of other twelve-step programs.

As summarized by the American Psychological Association, the initial steps were six as follows: admitting that one cannot control one’s alcoholism, addiction or compulsion;
recognizing a higher power that can restore sanity;
examining past errors with the help of a sponsor (experienced member);
making amends for these errors;
learning to live a new life with a new code of behavior;
helping others who suffer from the same alcoholism, addictions or compulsions. Read more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twelve-step_program

Twelve-step methods have been adapted to address a wide range of alcoholism, substance-abuse and dependency problems. Over 200 self-help organizations—often known as fellowships—with a worldwide membership of millions—now employ twelve-step principles for recovery. Narcotics Anonymous was formed by addicts who did not relate to the specifics of alcohol dependency.

Demographic preferences related to the addicts’ drug of choice has led to the creation of Cocaine Anonymous, Crystal Meth Anonymous, Pills Anonymous, Marijuana Anonymous and Nicotine Anonymous. Behavioral issues such as compulsion for, and/or addiction to, gambling, crime, food, sex, hoarding, debting and work are addressed in fellowships such as Gamblers Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous, Sexual Compulsives Anonymous, Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous, Sexaholics Anonymous, Sex Addicts Anonymous, Emotions Anonymous, Clutterers Anonymous, Debtors Anonymous and Workaholics Anonymous.

Auxiliary groups such as Al-Anon and Nar-Anon, for friends and family members of alcoholics and addicts, respectively, are part of a response to treating addiction as a disease that is enabled by family systems. Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA) addresses compulsions related to relationships, referred to as codependency. Read more